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Little Africa Tour

A Tour of Experience & Experiments

Little Africa – Over four million Africans were brought to  Brazil to be enslaved along the 300-year period of slavery in the country. Brazil was the last country to abolish the slavery economic system, in the late nineteenth century.  Nowadays more than half of Brazilians identify themselves as black.

The city of Rio was the world’s largest African slave market in the Nineteenth Century. One out of five enslaved of the modern era in the world step in into Rio.

Samba, carnival, food, music and religion, African culture is everywhere in Brazil.

Daily afternoon tour

Driver + Guide

HD 4 horas – Min. 2 pax

U$ 75,00 per pax

HD 6 horas – Including brasilian cuisine delicious lunch

U$ 95,00 per pax

About Little Africa

Over four million Africans were brought to  Brazil to be enslaved along the 300-year period of slavery in the country. Brazil was the last country to abolish the slavery economic system, in the late nineteenth century.  Nowadays more than half of Brazilians identify themselves as black.

The city of Rio was the world’s largest African slave market in the Nineteenth Century. One out of five enslaved of the modern era in the world step in into Rio.

Samba, carnival, food, music and religion, African culture is everywhere in Brazil.

Over four million Africans were brought to  Brazil to be enslaved along the 300-year period of slavery in the country. Brazil was the last country to abolish the slavery economic system, in 1888. More than half of Brazilians identify themselves as black.

Little Africa is the historic home of the Afro-Brazilian community in the Port Region of Rio de Janeiro. The region became known as Pequena Africa after the transatlantic slave trade became illegal in Brazil in 1831 – Although the abolition of slavery in Brazil would only happen 50 years later, in 1888.

Between 1850 and 1920, freed Africans remained in the region. Blacks Brazilians and Africans freed from Bahia or from the interior traveled to Pequena Africa looking for work and a sense of community.

Little Africa has often welcomed blacks people from all over  Brazil.

Little Africa tour covers the impact of the African diaspora through an African heritage route in the port region o Rio. At Pequena Africa, the first  Candomble temple, the African-Brazilian Religious Dance rituals in Honor of the African orixas’ place,  was open in Rio as well as the first samba music and carnival groups, called ranchos was created.

Pedra do Sal, where samba music was born in Rio, a rhythm that became a strong trait of Brazilian identity and culture. Until today, there are samba wheels that celebrate the blackness of the neighborhood, on Mondays and Fridays – Bear in mind,  Monday is the busiest day.

In Little Africa Carnival, of course,  is a tradition.  The highlights are the Escravos da Mauá block, which runs on Friday and Sunday during the carnival time, and the Vizinha Faladeira samba school.

A sightseeing tour through Pequena Africa is a rescued to the African – Brazilian memories.  You will be visiting sites related to the slavery traffic and post-abolition in Rio and Brazi,  where most of the descendants of the last generations of African enslaved that arrived illegally in Brazil re-wrote their/our history.

Pequena Africa – Over four million Africans were brought to  Brazil to be enslaved along the 300-year period of slavery in the country. Brazil was the last country to abolish the slavery economic system, in the late nineteenth century.  Nowadays more than half of Brazilians identify themselves as black.

The city of Rio was the world’s largest African slave market in the Nineteenth Century. One out of five enslaved of the modern era in the world step in into Rio.

Samba, carnival, food, music and religion, African culture is everywhere in Brazil.

Over four million Africans were brought to  Brazil to be enslaved along the 300-year period of slavery in the country. Brazil was the last country to abolish the slavery economic system, in 1888. More than half of Brazilians identify themselves as black.

The city of Rio was the world’s largest African slave market in the Nineteenth Century. One out of five enslaved of the modern era in the wold step in into Rio.

Citação:

“The Valongo Complex and its history reveal a close connection and a landmark of the relations between the city of Rio de Janeiro and the Atlantic world. The era of the transatlantic traffic of Africans, which turns it into a portal of the Atlantic, the link between the regions of capture and ports of embarkation on the African continent with the ports of Rio de Janeiro and other slave areas of Brazil, especially the entire south and southeast center, which made Rio de Janeiro the largest slave port of the Americas.

In post-abolition, Rio would be the gate through which an enormous contingent African descendant  returns to Rio, in an internal migration, occupying several areas of the city and its periphery, mainly the valongo region, which for a long time remains as a work space, housing, celebration and leisure of the African and Afro-Brazilian population. Keeping alive the memory of the tragedy, the pain, the suffering of the times of slavery perpetuated in the various forms of exclusion, which lack public policies of reparation, however, it is also a history of resistance, of capoeira, afro religious celebrations, samba de roda party … All that transformed the region of Little Africa into the cradle of the samba in Rio, which gave rise to the biggest popular festival in the country: The carnival parade.”

Cláudio de Paula Honorato – Valongo the market of souls of the Plaza carioca (Book).

  • Valongo Wharf Archaeological World Heritage Site
  • Warehouse docks Pedro II / Docas André Rebouças
  • IPN – A Memorial to the newly arrived African “enslaved”
  • MUHCAB – Museu da História e Cultura Afro-Brasileira
  • Pedra do Sal (Rock of Salt)
  • Morro da Conceição
  • Mercedes Baptista Statue
  • Largo da Prainha

+ Sobre o destino

You will be visiting sites related to the slavery  traffic and post-abolition in Rio, Brazil. 

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